TIKANGA (VALUES & PRACTICE)
       
Tikanga Description What it looks like Ways to incorporate into your own practice
Whakawhānaunga The process of connecting people Getting to know one another, whānau support, inclusiveness, connections Start each session with group based activities, pepeha, promoting and reinforcing the value of team work, encouraging whānau involvement, inclusion of kuia and koroua in activities
Manaaki Caring for people Rangatahi helping each other, tautoko, coaching, awhi (support), active listening, walking the talk, follow up Encourage helping and sharing, provide participants with the best resources and information available, feed them well
Kotahitanga Unity Everyone doing the same thing at the same time or contributing to the same goal or purpose Encourage unity, incorporate & play tākaro/kemu that all participants have to work together and are involved in, actively supporting each other to do well
Mana Rangatira The freedom to determine ones own destiny, living by a set of values (tikanga) and endeavouring to live by that code (even when nobody is watching) Goals, dream big, determine ones purpose in life, living by a set of values (tikanga) and endeavouring to live by that code at all times e.g. not touching other peoples things or stealing Give them the information and set the example to enable them to make their own choices, give them the opportunity to take the lead on a project, encourage them to actively be a part of negotiating e.g. via the tatu & tewhatewha processes, encourage goal setting and taking steps towards achieving what they want to aspire to achieve
Mohio Sharing of information Rangatahi building on their knowledge. learning new information /strategies Knowledge, share with rangatahi the necessary skill & information to be able to participate in Nga Taonga Takaro safely e.g. correct technique for waka paddling, running/passing/catching, injury prevention
Marama Understanding Can see the relevance in learning something and how they can apply it, time to digest and make sense of what they have learnt, ultimately the knowledge learn't is obsorbed & becomes second nature Ensure the rules of engagement are provided BEFORE each event, develop hand outs, provide opportunities for rangatahi to participate at every level e.g. kaiwawao (refing), Tewhatewha (team captain responsable for making decisions during play) coaching, kai tautoko, whakataetae facilatation & organising
Tuakana / Teina Older/younger relationships Older/senior rangatahi looking after the younger/junior rangatahi, or experienced helping those less experienced Assign older rangatahi the responsibility of taking care of others. Rangatahi who are further along in their learning helping those just starting out.
Kaitiaki Taking a guardianship role in area's such as traditional Māori tākaro, tikanga & kawa a Hapu, tiaki taiao (natural world and resources) Reciprocity (giving back) Ensure the grounds / facilities are in the same condition or better as when they arrive.ie pick up rubbish, recycle where appropriate
Whakapapa Genealogy of the rangatahi/whānau of others, the history of tipuna and of waahi Making whānau links in the group Mihimihi/pepeha, learning and sharing connections, whakapapa of taonga tākaro, place names, waka
Wairua Spirit, soul, that which exsists beyond the physical A sense of connection to that which is unseen, a belief, often intangible but a knowing/belief that something exsists A connection to whenua, ngahere, moana, maunga, awa, the unseen energy (intangible connections) which are often acknowledged through karakia and waiata, planned activities such as visits to places of significance e.g. pa sites/urupa can be heavily influenced by wairua (sometimes even guided by wairua)
Tikanga The putting into practice that which is correct Self regulating behaviour based on a set of principles, following ones own tikanga even when nobody is watching Explain rules, boundaries, and consequences, reward adherence to tikanga, encourage rangatahi to do the right thing by providing them with the essential information & practical examples to model their own behaviour by
Hākari Celebratory kai Sharing of kai, whānaungatanga Sharing korero, celebrating achievements of a group or of individuals, kai (food) plays an important role in all cultures, Important to remember is that the simple act of sharing a meal togeather has far reaching associated benefits, kai uplifts and nourishes the hinengaro, mauri, wairua, and tinana of the individual, kai is more than just a physical requirement
Atuatanga The taiao (environment) in all its forms e.g. animals, insects, trees, waterways, utilised as a metaphor for developing activities & wellness initiatives The use of karakia & waiata, respecting & acknowledging the various spaces/realms of Atua and the roles they play in everyday life Observing insects and animals and developing physical movements and tākaro based around what is observe. tamariki are particularly good at this type of development, learning around various Atua Māori connections and how those connections manafest in the natural world, how the knowledge can be used practically to perhaps re-connect us to the natural world, being aware of individuals and their differing beliefs and respecting those differences, karakia togeather as a roopu
Mauri Life principal, life force, vital essence Everything has a mauri, it flows through all things e.g. insects, people, tree's, water, rocks, soil, the sky and so on Treating everything with respect, karakia & waiata are ways of acknowledging the mauri of places, spaces, things, and importantly nature 'the origin of all things', practical activities like cleaning up local waterways is a way of acknowledging mauri, the hongi (traditional māori greeting of pressing noses togeather) is a way acknowledging the mauri of another individual, performing karakia before and after a game of ki o Rahi is another example
Whakawhānaunga
The process of connecting people
Getting to know one another, whānau support, inclusiveness, connections
Start each session with group based activities, pepeha, promoting and reinforcing the value of team work, encouraging whānau involvement, inclusion of kuia and koroua in activities
Manaaki
Caring for people
Rangatahi helping each other, tautoko, coaching, awhi (support), active listening, walking the talk, follow up
Encourage helping and sharing, provide participants with the best resources and information available, feed them well
Kotahitanga
Unity
Everyone doing the same thing at the same time or contributing to the same goal or purpose
Encourage unity, incorporate & play tākaro/kemu that all participants have to work together and are involved in, actively supporting each other to do well
Mana Rangatira
The freedom to determine ones own destiny, living by a set of values (tikanga) and endeavouring to live by that code (even when nobody is watching)
Goals, dream big, determine ones purpose in life, living by a set of values (tikanga) and endeavouring to live by that code at all times e.g. not touching other peoples things or stealing
Give them the information and set the example to enable them to make their own choices, give them the opportunity to take the lead on a project, encourage them to actively be a part of negotiating e.g. via the tatu & tewhatewha processes, encourage goal setting and taking steps towards achieving what they want to aspire to achieve
Mohio
Sharing of information
Rangatahi building on their knowledge. learning new information /strategies
Knowledge, share with rangatahi the necessary skill & information to be able to participate in Nga Taonga Takaro safely e.g. correct technique for waka paddling, running/passing/catching, injury prevention
Marama
Understanding
Can see the relevance in learning something and how they can apply it, time to digest and make sense of what they have learnt, ultimately the knowledge learn't is obsorbed & becomes second nature
Ensure the rules of engagement are provided BEFORE each event, develop hand outs, provide opportunities for rangatahi to participate at every level e.g. kaiwawao (refing), Tewhatewha (team captain responsable for making decisions during play) coaching, kai tautoko, whakataetae facilatation & organising
Tuakana / Teina
Older/younger relationships
Older/senior rangatahi looking after the younger/junior rangatahi, or experienced helping those less experienced
Assign older rangatahi the responsibility of taking care of others. Rangatahi who are further along in their learning helping those just starting out.
Kaitiaki
Taking a guardianship role in area's such as traditional Māori tākaro, tikanga & kawa a Hapu, tiaki taiao (natural world and resources)
Reciprocity (giving back)
Ensure the grounds / facilities are in the same condition or better as when they arrive.ie pick up rubbish, recycle where appropriate
Whakapapa
Genealogy of the rangatahi/whānau of others, the history of tipuna and of waahi
Making whānau links in the group
Mihimihi/pepeha, learning and sharing connections, whakapapa of taonga tākaro, place names, waka
Wairua
Spirit, soul, that which exsists beyond the physical
A sense of connection to that which is unseen, a belief, often intangible but a knowing/belief that something exsists
A connection to whenua, ngahere, moana, maunga, awa, the unseen energy (intangible connections) which are often acknowledged through karakia and waiata, planned activities such as visits to places of significance e.g. pa sites/urupa can be heavily influenced by wairua (sometimes even guided by wairua)
Tikanga
The putting into practice that which is correct
Self regulating behaviour based on a set of principles, following ones own tikanga even when nobody is watching
Explain rules, boundaries, and consequences, reward adherence to tikanga, encourage rangatahi to do the right thing by providing them with the essential information & practical examples to model their own behaviour by
Hākari
Celebratory kai
Sharing of kai, whānaungatanga
Sharing korero, celebrating achievements of a group or of individuals, kai (food) plays an important role in all cultures, Important to remember is that the simple act of sharing a meal togeather has far reaching associated benefits, kai uplifts and nourishes the hinengaro, mauri, wairua, and tinana of the individual, kai is more than just a physical requirement
Atuatanga
The taiao (environment) in all its forms e.g. animals, insects, trees, waterways, utilised as a metaphor for developing activities & wellness initiatives
The use of karakia & waiata, respecting & acknowledging the various spaces/realms of Atua and the roles they play in everyday life
Observing insects and animals and developing physical movements and tākaro based around what is observe. tamariki are particularly good at this type of development, learning around various Atua Māori connections and how those connections manafest in the natural world, how the knowledge can be used practically to perhaps re-connect us to the natural world, being aware of individuals and their differing beliefs and respecting those differences, karakia togeather as a roopu
Mauri
Life principal, life force, vital essence
Everything has a mauri, it flows through all things e.g. insects, people, tree's, water, rocks, soil, the sky and so on
Treating everything with respect, karakia & waiata are ways of acknowledging the mauri of places, spaces, things, and importantly nature 'the origin of all things', practical activities like cleaning up local waterways is a way of acknowledging mauri, the hongi (traditional māori greeting of pressing noses togeather) is a way acknowledging the mauri of another individual, performing karakia before and after a game of ki o Rahi is another example
Whakapā Mai
  

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